Tag Archives: St. Louis Cardinals

Play

DarylKile

Darryl Kile may not be a Hall of Famer, but I will never forget him.

He was never considered the best pitcher in baseball, but he was very good, and was emblematic of the rise of the Astros in the 1990s. Drafted in the 30th round of the same draft that included Craig Biggio, Kile was called up to the Show in 1991 and went on to be a very good cog in the Astros machine in the early-to-mid 1990s. On September 8, 1993, he pitched a no-hitter against the hapless New York Mets. (an interesting side note – the lineup of that 1993 team that no-hit the Mets included Biggio, Steve Finley, Luis Gonzalez, and Jeff Bagwell. It also included whiff machine/power threat Eric Anthony, who would go on to be traded to the Seattle Mariners for a pitcher named Mike Hampton. As much as I complain about Astros trades, that one was a good one for the rainbow warriors.

Have a listen! Also, like the show on http://facebook.com/thebaseballexperiencepodcast, follow me on twitter @scotteiland, and subscribe to the show for free at http://thebaseballexperience.com/itunes. You can email your feedback at scott@thebaseballexperience.com, or leave a comment below!


Category: Baseball
Play

rogershornsby

Rogers Hornsby (1896-1963) is one of the greatest players in the history of Major League Baseball. Thanks to Babe Ruth (who was the player who saved baseball after the destructive Black Sox Scandal) and Ty Cobb (another contemporary who is the only player to finish his career with a higher composite batting average), Hornsby is one of those players well known only to baseball junkies and historians. The brash, opinionated Texan was the best hitter in the 1920s not named Ruth or Cobb, and for a six year stretch (1920-1925) was absolutely unbelievable. He led the National League in batting in each one of those years, with averages of .370, .397, .401, .384, .424(!), and .403, an unheard-of run that will never happen again. He was also a power hitter, leading the NL in homers in 1922 with 42 (the second-place guy, Ray Grimes, hit only 21.) He regularly boasted OPS (on base average plus slugging percentage) numbers over 1.000. Because of a steep decline that occurred as the 1920s wore down (Hornsby had his share of injury problems), he finished his careeer with 2930 hits, seventy short of the almighty mark of 3000 hits. (more…)


Play
Mark McGwire gives testimony to Congressman Lacy

Mark McGwire gives testimony to Congressman Lacy

Mark McGwire is one of the most controversial figures in the “steroids era” and has fallen short of Hall of Fame election by the Baseball Writers Association of America. He will forever be linked with Roger Maris, as his storybook 1998 season in which he and Sammy Sosa both broke Maris’s 47-year-old single-season home run record (McGwire finished 1998 with 70 homers; Sosa finished with “only” 66). A huge, lumbering power hitter who didn’t field or run well, McGwire relied on his prodigious power to carve out what looked like a surefire Hall of Fame career.

Unfortunately, he used steroids during his playing career, and he wasn’t a good defender or baserunner. By the same token, he did hit 583 home runs for his career and had OPS numbers that are nothing short of stratospheric late in his career. He is one of two people to hit over sixty homers in a season twice, along with fellow baseball limbo-dweller Sammy Sosa.

One of the things that doesn’t help McGwire is his congressional testimony, which reads like a “what not to do” video in regards to public testimony. His famous quote “I’m not here to talk about the past” in response to Congressman Ed Lacy’s questions made him look even guiltier than he turned out to be. He eventually admitted to using steroids, citing “health reasons” for doing so. What I had such a hard time with was making a decision as to his Hall worthiness. If he never used a performance enhancing drug, would McGwire be a first-ballot Hall of Famer? Probably. 583 homers is an automatic entry into the Hall for most writers, and many of those writers would look at a .263 lifetime batting average and decide it’s more than outweighed by McGwire’s superior on base percentage.

What is the verdict? Download the podcast to find out.

Links for this episode:
Mark McGwire’s Baseball Reference Page
Sammy Sosa: Heck Yes we’re HOFERS
Marshall: McGwire is a Hall of Famer
Why McGwire doesn’t belong in the Hall

Be sure to subscribe to the show through iTunes. OUr feed address is http://feeds.feedburner.com/thebaseballexperiencespodcast. Copy and paste that into any podcatcher and you’ll be able to subscribe that way.